Mon-Fri – 8:00 AM – 5:30 PM

Emergency 24/7

Advanced Equine VETERINARY CARE

A well equipped and modern equine hospital for horse owners based in Auckland and Kumeu
COVID-19 LEVEL 3 UPDATE: As always, the team at Veterinary Associates will continue to provide 24/7 emergency veterinary care, including hospital care. We are following the government and New Zealand Veterinary Association (NZVA) recommendations in regards to COVID-19. Every effort is and will continue to be made to reduce contact with owners and fellow staff. Please bear with us as we will ask additional questions before visiting your horse. We will continue to assign priority via phone consultations and schedule call outs as required during level 3. If you are unsure whether your horse needs to be seen, please call us to discuss. The front reception will remain closed. Please contact us if you need anything from front reception or refills on medications, and this can be arranged in a contactless way. We are keeping close records of those we are in contact with during this time as per NZVA recommendations. Please stay safe and look after yourselves and our wonderful equestrian community. We look forward to seeing all of you at the races, shows, and events once this has passed!
For additional information on guidelines during this time please refer to  https://www.nzva.org.nz/page/covid/ and https://covid19.govt.nz/

THE BEST CARE FOR YOUR HORSE IN OUR
HOSPITAL AND IN THE FIELD

At Veterinary Associates, we provide a range of advanced equine veterinary services for higher performance,  better well being and quality of life.  Our purpose-built hospital is located in Karaka, Auckland and we provide dedicated equine veterinary services across the greater Karaka and Kumeu regions.

WHAT VETERINARY ServiceS CAN WE HELP YOU WITH?

Our combination of the latest ultrasonography practice, specialised reproductive techniques and dedicated experienced vets allows us to make the often-difficult process of equine reproduction a simple one.

Buying a horse usually requires the advice of a veterinarian. Our team is experienced and well equipped to help you with your decision by carrying out any ancillary examinations.

Regular dental checks are essential for your horses comfort, optimal diet and performance, and ensuring there is minimal risk of major dental problems over your horses life.  Mobile and hospital based treatment options available.

Our experienced ambulatory vets are fully equipped to handle multiple equine conditions at your property including lameness’s, sick horses, wounds and reproductive exams.

A PURPOSE BUILT HOSPITAL, FOR BETTER EQUINE VETERINARY CARE

Our multi-disciplinary team and purpose-built hospital enable us to provide the very best veterinary care for equine and farm animals. This includes advanced surgical, medical, and imaging services as well as excellent ambulatory, reproductive, performance and dentistry care.

Whether you are wanting a comprehensive pre-purchase examination, a routine health or performance checkup, or if your horse requires intensive hospital care, our dedicated team of experienced veterinarians are by your side, here to answer any questions you have and deliver the very best veterinary care available. 

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EQUINE HOSPITAL & FACILITIES

24/7 Monitoring

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Our hospital operates 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year. If your horse or animal needs overnight monitoring, our purpose-built class facilities are equipped to ensure your animal recieves excellent care.

SURGERY

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The Veterinary Associates Equine Hospital is a state of the art facility with a superb surgical suite to ensure your horse is cared for in the most efficient and safest way possible.

DIAGNOSTIC IMAGING

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The hospital team provide 24-hour care to critical patients including foals and horses recovering from surgery. All care is provided in our purpose built hospital facility.

IN-HOUSE LAB

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Our experienced ambulatory vets are fully equipped to handle multiple equine conditions at your property including lameness’s, sick horses, wounds and reproductive exams.

TESTIMONIALS

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LATEST UPDATES & SOCIAL

To learn more about our latest cases, company updates, announcements, and more, visit our Facebook pages below:
Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons

The Vet Associates Equine team is so proud to have performed the surgery and overseen the post-operative care for #downbytheseaside. We wish Woodlands Stud NZ and Diamond Creek Farm all the best with him in the future!DOWNBYTHESEASIDE is set to kick of the 2021-22 breeding season this coming Friday (October 15th) after making a full recovery following his colic surgery in August.

He is set to serve an outstanding book of mares across Australasia this season. His Australian book is full and closed and his New Zealand book is nearing capacity.

Orders are to be placed by Thursday (1pm AEST, 3pm NZT) for Friday shipping.

Read the full update here: bit.ly/3awjPcZ

#woodlandsstud #woodlandssired #downbytheseaside #catchthenextwave #makingasplash #theAteam #yoursuccessisoursuccess #sharethedream
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The Vet Associates Equine team is so proud to have performed the surgery and overseen the post-operative care for #downbytheseaside. We wish Woodlands Stud NZ and Diamond Creek Farm all the best with him in the future!

Foaling week

Now that you have a new foal on the ground, we really want to come make sure both your mare and foal are healthy. We'll come out within 24 hours of your foal's delivery to check in on mum and baby.
At this exam, we look at the placenta to make sure it is normal and was delivered completely. We screen foals for any congenital abnormality, and we run a blood test to make sure they have consumed enough colostrum. Foals are effectively born without an immune system. They receive antibodies from the mare's milk in their first few hours of life. If they don't consume enough, or if the mare's colostrum is of poor quality, they can be in danger of becoming seriously ill.
This blood test, an IgG, which can be done in house at Veterinary associates, will show appropriate transfer of immunity from the mare to the foal.
Call your vet if your foal is weak or lethargic, does not nurse, urinate or defecate, has diarrhoea, swollen joints, abnormal vital signs, urine leaking from umbilicus, shows signs of pain or lameness. If in doubt, call your vet and we are happy to discuss and work out a plan.
... See MoreSee Less

Foaling week

Now that you have a new foal on the ground, we really want to come make sure both your mare and foal are healthy. Well come out within 24 hours of your foals delivery to check in on mum and baby. 
At this exam, we look at the placenta to make sure it is normal and was delivered completely. We screen foals for any congenital abnormality, and we run a blood test to make sure they have consumed enough colostrum. Foals are effectively born without an immune system. They receive antibodies from the mares milk in their first few hours of life. If they dont consume enough, or if the mares colostrum is of poor quality, they can be in danger of becoming seriously ill. 
This blood test, an IgG, which can be done in house at Veterinary associates, will show appropriate transfer of immunity from the mare to the foal.
Call your vet if your foal is weak or lethargic, does not nurse, urinate or defecate, has diarrhoea, swollen joints, abnormal vital signs, urine leaking from umbilicus, shows signs of pain or lameness. If in doubt, call your vet and we are happy to discuss and work out a plan.

Foaling week

Foaling emergencies can be terrifying. Knowing what is an emergency and how to respond quickly will give you the best chance for a successful outcome.

Foals should stand within the first hour of life and nurse within the second hour. The mare should deliver the placenta within three hours. This is the 1-2-3 rule. If your mare and foal deviate from this, it is an emergency.

If you see a red bag protruding from the vulva during delivery rather than a white, shiny bag, this is an emergency known as a red bag delivery. This can be life threatening to the foal as it means that the placenta has separated from the uterus prematurely. This can result in the foal not receiving enough oxygen during delivery.

A retained placenta occurs when the mare doesn't deliver the placenta within three hours. Up to 10% of mares will retain their placenta, and they are more likely to do so following a difficult birth (dystocia). A retained placenta increases the mare's risk of severe infection and laminitis.

If you suspect a problem during the foaling process ( such as a foal which is not in the normal birth position) call your vet immediately , this is an emergency.

Some mares, especially maiden mares, do not take to their foals. They may require additional help getting the hang of the nursing thing. If your mare is not allowing the foal to nurse, this is an emergency.

Foals should come out pretty clean. Occasionally, they come out meconium stained (a bit yellow or brown). This definitely warrants a call to us as it can indicate a foal who had a difficult birth.

These are definitely not the only emergencies, just the most important ones. Please call us if you have any questions about your mare, foaling, or new foals.

Cute image courtesy of one of our admin staff Gailene!
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Foaling week 

Foaling emergencies can be terrifying. Knowing what is an emergency and how to respond quickly will give you the best chance for a successful outcome. 

Foals should stand within the first hour of life and nurse within the second hour. The mare should deliver the placenta within three hours. This is the 1-2-3 rule. If your mare and foal deviate from this, it is an emergency.

If you see a red bag protruding from the vulva during delivery rather than a white, shiny bag, this is an emergency known as a red bag delivery. This can be life threatening to the foal as it means that the placenta has separated from the uterus prematurely. This can result in the foal not receiving enough oxygen during delivery. 

A retained placenta occurs when the mare doesnt deliver the placenta within three hours. Up to 10% of mares will retain their placenta, and they are more likely to do so following a difficult birth (dystocia). A retained placenta increases the mares risk of severe infection and laminitis. 

If you suspect a problem during the foaling process ( such as a foal which is not in the normal birth position) call your vet immediately , this is an emergency.

Some mares, especially maiden mares, do not take to their foals. They may require additional help getting the hang of the nursing thing. If your mare is not allowing the foal to nurse, this is an emergency. 

Foals should come out pretty clean. Occasionally, they come out meconium stained (a bit yellow or brown). This definitely warrants a call to us as it can indicate a foal who had a difficult birth. 

These are definitely not the only emergencies, just the most important ones. Please call us if you have any questions about your mare, foaling, or new foals. 

Cute image courtesy of one of our admin staff Gailene!

Contact Us

We are open Mon-Fri – 8:00 AM – 5:30 PM for routine appointments and 24/7 for emergency care.

Phone Karaka

Phone Kumeu