Mon-Fri – 8:00 AM – 5:30 PM

Emergency 24/7

CLINIC UPDATES

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2 weeks ago
Jeremy Bullock

Embryo Transfers going great this season! Veterinary Associates Equine - Karaka ... See MoreSee Less

Embryo Transfers going great this season! Veterinary Associates Equine - Karaka

We are having a power cut across the whole area at the moment that is affecting our phone lines too. We will let you know when we are back to normal but please note your calls may be diverted to our out of hours service whilst the power gets back up and running. We are continuing to provide our normal service throughout. ... See MoreSee Less

Mare grazing and breeding services in conjunction with Veterinary Associates Equine LP ... See MoreSee Less

Mare grazing and breeding services in conjunction with Veterinary Associates Equine LP

Photos from NZ Equine Academy's post ... See MoreSee Less

Horses are likely to be spooked by #fireworks – talk to your neighbours about the use of fireworks and move your horse away from locations that fireworks will be set off. Secure them in a stable if you can, to reduce the chance of them injuring themselves.
#ReduceFireworksFear
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From tomorrow, #fireworks go on sale to the New Zealand public.
Please think before you buy fireworks to use at home – fireworks cause stress, fear and anxiety in animals making this time of the year a scary time for animals across New Zealand.
The NZVA believes that to protect animals from direct and indirect harm caused by fireworks, the sale of fireworks to the public should be banned, and licensing arrangements should be instituted for individuals or organisations to responsibly detonate fireworks in public displays approved by the relevant territorial authority.
#ReduceFireworksFear
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Mare grazing and breeding services in conjunction with Veterinary Associates Equine LP ... See MoreSee Less

Mare grazing and breeding services in conjunction with Veterinary Associates Equine LP

Comment on Facebook

Fabulous service & care! Cannot recommend enough!

Deb Ryburn

The Vet Associates Equine team is so proud to have performed the surgery and overseen the post-operative care for #downbytheseaside. We wish Woodlands Stud NZ and Diamond Creek Farm all the best with him in the future!DOWNBYTHESEASIDE is set to kick of the 2021-22 breeding season this coming Friday (October 15th) after making a full recovery following his colic surgery in August.

He is set to serve an outstanding book of mares across Australasia this season. His Australian book is full and closed and his New Zealand book is nearing capacity.

Orders are to be placed by Thursday (1pm AEST, 3pm NZT) for Friday shipping.

Read the full update here: bit.ly/3awjPcZ

#woodlandsstud #woodlandssired #downbytheseaside #catchthenextwave #makingasplash #theAteam #yoursuccessisoursuccess #sharethedream
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The Vet Associates Equine team is so proud to have performed the surgery and overseen the post-operative care for #downbytheseaside. We wish Woodlands Stud NZ and Diamond Creek Farm all the best with him in the future!

Foaling week

Now that you have a new foal on the ground, we really want to come make sure both your mare and foal are healthy. We'll come out within 24 hours of your foal's delivery to check in on mum and baby.
At this exam, we look at the placenta to make sure it is normal and was delivered completely. We screen foals for any congenital abnormality, and we run a blood test to make sure they have consumed enough colostrum. Foals are effectively born without an immune system. They receive antibodies from the mare's milk in their first few hours of life. If they don't consume enough, or if the mare's colostrum is of poor quality, they can be in danger of becoming seriously ill.
This blood test, an IgG, which can be done in house at Veterinary associates, will show appropriate transfer of immunity from the mare to the foal.
Call your vet if your foal is weak or lethargic, does not nurse, urinate or defecate, has diarrhoea, swollen joints, abnormal vital signs, urine leaking from umbilicus, shows signs of pain or lameness. If in doubt, call your vet and we are happy to discuss and work out a plan.
... See MoreSee Less

Foaling week

Now that you have a new foal on the ground, we really want to come make sure both your mare and foal are healthy. Well come out within 24 hours of your foals delivery to check in on mum and baby. 
At this exam, we look at the placenta to make sure it is normal and was delivered completely. We screen foals for any congenital abnormality, and we run a blood test to make sure they have consumed enough colostrum. Foals are effectively born without an immune system. They receive antibodies from the mares milk in their first few hours of life. If they dont consume enough, or if the mares colostrum is of poor quality, they can be in danger of becoming seriously ill. 
This blood test, an IgG, which can be done in house at Veterinary associates, will show appropriate transfer of immunity from the mare to the foal.
Call your vet if your foal is weak or lethargic, does not nurse, urinate or defecate, has diarrhoea, swollen joints, abnormal vital signs, urine leaking from umbilicus, shows signs of pain or lameness. If in doubt, call your vet and we are happy to discuss and work out a plan.

Foaling week

Foaling emergencies can be terrifying. Knowing what is an emergency and how to respond quickly will give you the best chance for a successful outcome.

Foals should stand within the first hour of life and nurse within the second hour. The mare should deliver the placenta within three hours. This is the 1-2-3 rule. If your mare and foal deviate from this, it is an emergency.

If you see a red bag protruding from the vulva during delivery rather than a white, shiny bag, this is an emergency known as a red bag delivery. This can be life threatening to the foal as it means that the placenta has separated from the uterus prematurely. This can result in the foal not receiving enough oxygen during delivery.

A retained placenta occurs when the mare doesn't deliver the placenta within three hours. Up to 10% of mares will retain their placenta, and they are more likely to do so following a difficult birth (dystocia). A retained placenta increases the mare's risk of severe infection and laminitis.

If you suspect a problem during the foaling process ( such as a foal which is not in the normal birth position) call your vet immediately , this is an emergency.

Some mares, especially maiden mares, do not take to their foals. They may require additional help getting the hang of the nursing thing. If your mare is not allowing the foal to nurse, this is an emergency.

Foals should come out pretty clean. Occasionally, they come out meconium stained (a bit yellow or brown). This definitely warrants a call to us as it can indicate a foal who had a difficult birth.

These are definitely not the only emergencies, just the most important ones. Please call us if you have any questions about your mare, foaling, or new foals.

Cute image courtesy of one of our admin staff Gailene!
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Foaling week 

Foaling emergencies can be terrifying. Knowing what is an emergency and how to respond quickly will give you the best chance for a successful outcome. 

Foals should stand within the first hour of life and nurse within the second hour. The mare should deliver the placenta within three hours. This is the 1-2-3 rule. If your mare and foal deviate from this, it is an emergency.

If you see a red bag protruding from the vulva during delivery rather than a white, shiny bag, this is an emergency known as a red bag delivery. This can be life threatening to the foal as it means that the placenta has separated from the uterus prematurely. This can result in the foal not receiving enough oxygen during delivery. 

A retained placenta occurs when the mare doesnt deliver the placenta within three hours. Up to 10% of mares will retain their placenta, and they are more likely to do so following a difficult birth (dystocia). A retained placenta increases the mares risk of severe infection and laminitis. 

If you suspect a problem during the foaling process ( such as a foal which is not in the normal birth position) call your vet immediately , this is an emergency.

Some mares, especially maiden mares, do not take to their foals. They may require additional help getting the hang of the nursing thing. If your mare is not allowing the foal to nurse, this is an emergency. 

Foals should come out pretty clean. Occasionally, they come out meconium stained (a bit yellow or brown). This definitely warrants a call to us as it can indicate a foal who had a difficult birth. 

These are definitely not the only emergencies, just the most important ones. Please call us if you have any questions about your mare, foaling, or new foals. 

Cute image courtesy of one of our admin staff Gailene!

Foal Week

There are three stages of a normal foaling.

Stage 1
This stage is when the foal makes its final preparations before delivery. They move around in the uterus to get into the right place, and the first uterine contractions move the foal's head and forelimbs into the pelvic canal. The mare might look like she's displaying signs of colic. As always, please call us and let us know what's going on, especially if you aren't sure. Try not to disturb your mare during this time. If this has been going on for more than three hours, please call us as it may be abnormal.

Stage 2

Stage two officially starts when the mare's waters break. Within five minutes of the waters breaking, you should see the amnion protruding from the vulva. This will be white and shiny. If you see a red bag protruding, this is absolutely an emergency! Please call us immediately. This is also called a red bag presentation. The red membranes need to be broken, and the foal delivered as quickly as possible. You will be able to see your mare contracting as she delivers the foal. The amniotic sac usually ruptures during birth; if not, it should be gently opened and removed from around the foal’s nose and muzzle immediately after the delivery. The foal is usually delivered within 30 minutes of the waters breaking. If at any time, the delivery does not appear to be proceeding as normal, or if more than ten minutes pass with no progression, call your vet.

Stage 3

In this stage, the foal is already delivered, and the mare delivers the placenta. If it is dragging on the ground, consider tying it up above the hocks to avoid it tearing or tracking mud/bacteria into the uterus. DO NOT cut or tear the placenta. It is very important that the whole placenta comes out, and we will want to examine it when we come visit your mare and her new foal. When it has been delivered, save it in a cool, dry place in a bag or a covered bucket. Do not leave it out in the sun. Retained membranes occur in 2-10% of foalings, and retention is more common after dystocia (difficult foaling). If the mare has retained membranes, she is at great risk of infection and laminitis. For this reason, the mare needs to be seen by a vet if she has not passed the membranes within 3 hours of foaling.

As always, do not hesitate to contact Veterinary Associates with any questions. The best way to avoid problems is to be prepared with a plan!
www.vetassociates.co.nz/contact-us/

Image www.burwashequine.ca/blog/2018/3/2/placentitis-why-you-should-monitor-your-pregnant-mare
... See MoreSee Less

Foal Week 

There are three stages of a normal foaling.

Stage 1
This stage is when the foal makes its final preparations before delivery. They move around in the uterus to get into the right place, and the first uterine contractions move the foals head and forelimbs into the pelvic canal. The mare might look like shes displaying signs of colic. As always, please call us and let us know whats going on, especially if you arent sure. Try not to disturb your mare during this time. If this has been going on for more than three hours, please call us as it may be abnormal. 

Stage 2

Stage two officially starts when the mares waters break. Within five minutes of the waters breaking, you should see the amnion protruding from the vulva. This will be white and shiny. If you see a red bag protruding, this is absolutely an emergency! Please call us immediately. This is also called a red bag presentation. The red membranes need to be broken, and the foal delivered as quickly as possible. You will be able to see your mare contracting as she delivers the foal. The amniotic sac usually ruptures during birth; if not, it should be gently opened and removed from around the foal’s nose and muzzle immediately after the delivery. The foal is usually delivered within 30 minutes of the waters breaking. If at any time, the delivery does not appear to be proceeding as normal, or if more than ten minutes pass with no progression, call your vet.

Stage 3

In this stage, the foal is already delivered, and the mare delivers the placenta.  If it is dragging on the ground, consider tying it up above the hocks to avoid it tearing or tracking mud/bacteria into the uterus. DO NOT cut or tear the placenta. It is very important that the whole placenta comes out, and we will want to examine it when we come visit your mare and her new foal. When it has been delivered, save it in a cool, dry place in a bag or a covered bucket. Do not leave it out in the sun. Retained membranes occur in 2-10% of foalings, and retention is more common after dystocia (difficult foaling). If the mare has retained membranes, she is at great risk of infection and laminitis. For this reason, the mare needs to be seen by a vet if she has not passed the membranes within 3 hours of foaling.

As always, do not hesitate to contact Veterinary Associates with any questions. The best way to avoid problems is to be prepared with a plan!
https://www.vetassociates.co.nz/contact-us/

Image https://www.burwashequine.ca/blog/2018/3/2/placentitis-why-you-should-monitor-your-pregnant-mare

This week has been Vet Nurse Appreciation week, and while we appreciate them every day, we’ll take the opportunity to brag on our wonderful nursing staff. This team makes EVERYTHING run more smoothly. Our nurses take care of our surgical patients, administer treatments, organize the pharmacy, handle patients on farm calls, take all the X-rays and run all the lab work. Honestly, that’s only a fraction of it. We couldn’t do what we do without them, and we are so grateful! ... See MoreSee Less

This week has been Vet Nurse Appreciation week, and while we appreciate them every day, we’ll take the opportunity to brag on our wonderful nursing staff. This team makes EVERYTHING run more smoothly. Our nurses take care of our surgical patients, administer treatments, organize the pharmacy, handle patients on farm calls, take all the X-rays and run all the lab work. Honestly, that’s only a fraction of it. We couldn’t do what we do without them, and we are so grateful!

Comment on Facebook

Thank you to our nurses you guys are superstars. We would be lost without you ❤️❤️

Absolutely awesome team of nurses ❤️

Love you guys you are all the best 😍😍 miss you so much !!!!!!!

Fab team full stop😍

Chelsea Mckenzie superstar 🥰

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COVID-19 LEVEL 3 UPDATE

As always, the team at Veterinary Associates will continue to provide 24/7 emergency veterinary care, including hospital care. We are following the government and New Zealand Veterinary Association (NZVA) recommendations in regards to COVID-19. Every effort is and will continue to be made to reduce contact with owners and fellow staff. Please bear with us as we will ask additional questions before visiting your horse. We will continue to assign priority via phone consultations and schedule call outs as required during level 3. If you are unsure whether your horse needs to be seen, please call us to discuss. The front reception will remain closed. Please contact us if you need anything from front reception or refills on medications, and this can be arranged in a contactless way. We are keeping close records of those we are in contact with during this time as per NZVA recommendations. Please stay safe and look after yourselves and our wonderful equestrian community. We look forward to seeing all of you at the races, shows, and events once this has passed!
For additional information on guidelines during this time please refer to  https://www.nzva.org.nz/page/covid/ and https://covid19.govt.nz/

We are well and truly into the foaling season, but for those of you still waiting for new arrivals, we are working through level 4 to help ensure your foals safe delivery.  If you have any questions or need advice, please give us a call or visit our reproduction page for more information.

To be successful in any sporting arena, your horses need to be in optimal condition for not just competition day, but the entire season.  Ensuring your horse maintains peak performance and does not develop lameness or poor results is easier said than done.  We offer individual performance and treatment plans to ensure your horses are ready and prepared for competitions and the entire competitive season. If you have any questions about your horses condition, please give us a call.

Contact Us

Mon-Fri – 8:00 AM – 5:30 PM
Sat – 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Emergency 24/7 

Phone Karaka

Phone Kumeu