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Happy Wednesday team! For today's Mythbuster Monday on a Wednesday...

Myth: Walking a colicking horse will resolve the colic.

Fact: Walking a tired and dehydrated horse may exacerbate the colic signs. If the horse is resting comfortably, either standing or lying down, then walking is not required.

If the horse is excessively rolling or restless, walking can be beneficial to prevent injury or distress from thrashing. Some painful colics may need to be kept in a safe paddock or stable while you wait for your vet to arrive, to keep your horse safe and yourself.

The most important thing while waiting for the vet is to keep the horse and people involved safe, so use your best judgement and remove any feed and hay.

Seek early treatment, the sooner the better. A large proportion of colics can be treated medically with basic treatment methods, others can be life threatening and may require surgery or euthanasia.

If colic is suspected, call us immediately on 09 294 7307/ 09 412 7388 www.vetassociates.co.nz/contact-us/

Source : Check out the image below and this link from the American Association of Equine Practitioners for more information on recognizing the signs and minimizing incidence aaep.org/horsehealth/colic-minimizing-its-incidence-and-impact-your-horse
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Happy Wednesday team! For todays Mythbuster Monday on a Wednesday...

Myth: Walking a colicking horse will resolve the colic.

Fact: Walking a tired and dehydrated horse may exacerbate the colic signs. If the horse is resting comfortably, either standing or lying down, then walking is not required.

If the horse is excessively rolling or restless, walking can be beneficial to prevent injury or distress from thrashing. Some painful colics may need to be kept in a safe paddock or stable while you wait for your vet to arrive, to keep your horse safe and yourself.

The most important thing while waiting for the vet is to keep the horse and people involved safe, so use your best judgement and remove any feed and hay.

Seek early treatment, the sooner the better. A large proportion of colics can be treated medically with basic treatment methods, others can be life threatening and may require surgery or euthanasia.

If colic is suspected, call us immediately on 09 294 7307/ 09 412 7388 https://www.vetassociates.co.nz/contact-us/

Source : Check out the image below and this link from the American Association of Equine Practitioners for more information on recognizing the signs and minimizing incidence https://aaep.org/horsehealth/colic-minimizing-its-incidence-and-impact-your-horse

Comment on Facebook

Thanks Tarryn and Jenny, and the the girls at clinic, for taking such good care of my mare last week! Abby is back to normal after what I’ve dubbed “the week from hell!”

Mine Sat on his hind end like a dog, not eating and lay on his side panting. Been a year since Surgery at Vet Associates and he is doing well.🦄

Stay tuned! This week's Mythbuster Monday will be brought to you on Tuesday, because, Level 4...

If you have any myths you want us to bust, leave them in the comments below 🧐
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Myth Buster Monday

Myth: When my horse chokes, rinsing its mouth with the garden hose will help clear the blockage.

Fact: Flushing the horse’s mouth with a hose may lead to aspiration of water into the lungs. The best thing to do is remove all feed and water, try to keep the horse calm with a lowered head.

Esophageal obstruction, or “choke,” is a common equine emergency. Unlike in human medicine, where choking refers to a tracheal (or windpipe) obstruction, choke in horses refers to an obstruction of the esophagus, the muscular tube that carries food from the mouth to the stomach. The most common sign horse owners recognize is feed material coming from the nostrils, although they might also notice choking horses hypersalivating, retching, not eating, acting colicky, or coughing. Chokes can have serious consequences, so it is important to have your veterinarian evaluate your horse as soon as possible.

Most commonly, chokes occur when horses eat concentrated feed too quickly without chewing it appropriately. The feed does not get softened with saliva and forms a firm bolus that gets lodged in the esophagus. However, esophageal obstruction can also occur with hay or straw, hard treats, carrots, or nonfood objects. Anatomical problems, such as poor dentition and abnormal esophagus anatomy, can also predispose a horse to choking.

Read more about this condition aaep.org/horsehealth/understanding-choke-horses

Call your veterinarian as soon as you notice signs of choke 09 294 7307/ 09 412 7388
... See MoreSee Less

Myth Buster Monday

Myth: When my horse chokes, rinsing its mouth with the garden hose will help clear the blockage.

Fact: Flushing the horse’s mouth with a hose may lead to aspiration of water into the lungs. The best thing to do is remove all feed and water, try to keep the horse calm with a lowered head.

Esophageal obstruction, or “choke,” is a common equine emergency. Unlike in human medicine, where choking refers to a tracheal (or windpipe) obstruction, choke in horses refers to an obstruction of the esophagus, the muscular tube that carries food from the mouth to the stomach. The most common sign horse owners recognize is feed material coming from the nostrils, although they might also notice choking horses hypersalivating, retching, not eating, acting colicky, or coughing. Chokes can have serious consequences, so it is important to have your veterinarian evaluate your horse as soon as possible.

Most commonly, chokes occur when horses eat concentrated feed too quickly without chewing it appropriately. The feed does not get softened with saliva and forms a firm bolus that gets lodged in the esophagus. However, esophageal obstruction can also occur with hay or straw, hard treats, carrots, or nonfood objects. Anatomical problems, such as poor dentition and abnormal esophagus anatomy, can also predispose a horse to choking.

Read more about this condition https://aaep.org/horsehealth/understanding-choke-horses

Call your veterinarian as soon as you notice signs of choke  09 294 7307/ 09 412 7388

Comment on Facebook

That is good. Something I cover in my Equine First Aid clinics. Though I've never had anyone say flush with a hose! Definitely don't want that. Good write up❤

I had my cobs do this. At a young age, they do outgrow it. One collapsed just as the vet arrived, cleared his chock and got up. All was good. Just don't feed dry feed when they are starving!!! letting them bolt it down causes the problem.

Miĺie was well in her teens when she had it with a week old foal at foot. Pretty sure it was dry kikuyu.

Just been through it for the 1st time last week..It was terrible made even worse by living out of mobile phone coverage and our whole area house phone lines were out..but a drive to the end of our road finally got a vet on the way and it all turned out ok in the end..

Cobs are always starving

Could you do a post like this for colic? 🙂

Sam Samantha Low Ruth McManus. Maybe good info for our Facebook page or newsletter

Mallory Claire Jayna Dinneen

Thankyoy

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Not our typical day in West Auckland. Dr. Ella came to the rescue this morning, along with our friends at the Rodney Animal Rescue! ... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

Nice work team! As always you guys come through!! It’s very reassuring having Kaylin and Ella in our area, can’t recommend them enough. They are totally fabulous 🥰

First assisted foaling of the season for the Vet Associates team. We were thrilled to help welcome this lovely filly into the world! We feel lucky to be providing essential veterinary care during this time. ... See MoreSee Less

First assisted foaling of the season for the Vet Associates team. We were thrilled to help welcome this lovely filly into the world! We feel lucky to be providing essential veterinary care during this time.

Comment on Facebook

Beautiful! Congrats and thanks for all you do. X

1 month ago
Louise Dempsey

Whisper left Vet Associates a year and two weeks ago, after two major colic surgeries. He was a regular there for many weeks and was treated like a prince by the team. It was a very tough time, but thanks to Jenny, Lacy and their team, plus Ellie and Tim Montgomery at Endsleigh Farm, who managed his rehab so competently, he is now a happy and healthy pony. Yesterday he came second in a 1.10cm round at Abdurry. ... See MoreSee Less

Whisper left Vet Associates a year and two weeks ago, after two major colic surgeries. He was a regular there for many weeks and was treated like a prince by the team. It was a very tough time, but thanks to Jenny, Lacy and their team, plus Ellie and Tim Montgomery at Endsleigh Farm, who managed his rehab so competently,  he is now a happy and healthy pony.  Yesterday he came second in a 1.10cm round at Abdurry.

Comment on Facebook

They make it look easy! He is such a superstar!

Publication of the most recent sport horse sires rankingsSIRE RANKINGS

Here are the latest sires rankings based on the published points earned by horses in the 5 and 6 year old Show Jumping series.
These rankings cover the last two years.
www.nzequestrian.org.nz/wp-content/uploads/New-Zealand-Sport-Horse-Sire-Rankings_july2021_v1.pdf

Over the last two seasons there were 233 horses that obtained points in the 5 and 6 year old Show Jumping series. These horses were sired by 91 different sires. Almost half the sires recorded had only one progeny that obtained points. The most popular sires were Cassiano, Euro Sport Centavos and Corofino 11, with 19, 16 and 14 progeny listed respectively.

A full list of sires is provided alphabetically for viewing. However, for rankings, the list has been restricted to sires with three or more progeny.

A big thank you to Massey University for providing these valuable insights.
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Publication of the most recent sport horse sires rankings

Please note, our front desk will no longer be open on Saturday mornings. However, you can still pick up items as needed by getting in touch with the on call vet through our main number 09 294 7307. ... See MoreSee Less

Gastric Ulcer Syndrome Presentation & Demonstration

Jenny & Tarryn had great fun meeting the Mangere Pony Club members and teaching them all about gastric ulcer syndrome. Thank you to the committee for letting our team join your rally! www.facebook.com/mangereponyclub/posts/4660299767331984
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Gastric Ulcer Syndrome Presentation & Demonstration

Jenny & Tarryn had great fun meeting the Mangere Pony Club members and teaching them all about gastric ulcer syndrome. Thank you to the committee for letting our team join your rally! https://www.facebook.com/mangereponyclub/posts/4660299767331984

Comment on Facebook

It was such an interesting and informative session - thanks Jenny and Tarryn.

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